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Ocean salmon fishing looks a bit brighter for 2018

Ocean salmon anglers will have better opportunities this year based on recommendations made Tuesday during a Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting in Portland. Sport salmon fishing in the ocean off the Columbia River opens June 23 and is expected to run through Labor Day unless salmon quotas are reached earlier. “While this won’t be a banner year for ocean salmon fishing, overall it’s an improvement from 2017,” said Chris Kern, an administrator for Oregon Department of Fish an (continued)


Clatsop college tuition to increase $3 per credit

Tuition at Clatsop Community College will increase $3, effective summer term 2018. The college’s Board of Directors voted 6-1 in favor of the increase at their Tuesday night meeting. “We have come out of the financial crisis the college went through and we need to be responsible to students and the college to not put ourselves in that situation again,” board member Robert Duehmig said. “As much as I hate an increase that affects student costs, we need to be able to keep the services and (continued)


Work set to begin on school bond measure

The school board voted unanimously Wednesday night to take all necessary steps to put a bond measure on the November ballot. The Warrenton-Hammond School District will ask voters to tax themselves for 20 years in order to buy land in an uplands area, construct a new school compound and repair and upgrade current facilities. While the exact amount hasn’t been determined, the district is likely to need $32 to $37 million over the next two decades. The board’s action Wednesday gives th (continued)


Home prices up as region struggles to meet demand

Home sales rose 22 percent countywide during the past year, although sales in Warrenton and Hammond were down, according to the Clatsop Association of Realtors’ multiple listing service. Some areas of the county saw huge increases year over year, including Arch Cape and Surf Pines. Other areas, including Warrenton and Hammond, show future promise. Home prices rose 16 and 15 percent in Warrenton and Hammond, respectively. “Supply and demand is totally askew,” said Pam Ackley, a real estate (continued)


Invasive Oregon tree species could be boon for wood products market

Western juniper now available to contractors

An invasive tree that has spread widely across parts of Oregon could become a lucrative wood product commodity, according to scientists at Oregon State University in Corvallis. They conducted tests on western juniper lumber and the results were accepted in February by the American Lumber Standards Committee, a nonprofit organization whose accreditation program forms the basis for the sale of most softwood lumber in North America. Acceptance means that, for the first time, western juniper will (continued)


New flagpole makes the best of a bad situation

Five city employees were honored this week for their foresight in saving a piece of history and, well, turning it into something cool. They came up with a plan last July after Western Skies, a fishing boat that had been abandoned at Warrenton Marina, sunk in its mooring slip. They did an emergency vessel seizure, pulled the boat out of the water, salvaged what they could and demolished what was left. The mast was turned into a flagpole, which was installed next to the marina offices earlier (continued)


Warrenton could get area's first Wendy's

A Wendy’s fast-food restaurant could be on its way to Warrenton. A representative of the company submitted plans to the city this week for a 2,400-square-foot restaurant in the Warrenton Highlands shopping center across from Home Depot. Plan submitted by Baysinger Partners Architecture in Portland include a drive-through window, 11 tables inside the restaurant and several more on a patio. At its busiest times, the restaurant could do up to 170 transactions per hour. The proposed Wendy’s (continued)


Airport land a perfect fit for eco-business park

What better place to study the effects of tides and wetlands than in the thick of them. The Port of Astoria’s business park -- a concept devised long ago yet still an empty field – could become home to a Center for Environmental Studies. “One of the biggest things we face in our area is navigating the balance of living in a sensitive ecological area with our economic restraints,” said Jim Knight, executive director of the Port of Astoria. The port’s land adjacent to the airport could (continued)


New rockfish season provides opportunity

Oregon fishermen have more opportunities to catch rockfish, or groundfish, following NOAA Fisheries’ approval of a new ocean fishery that uses selective gear to target plentiful species off Oregon while avoiding overfished species. NOAA Fisheries this week announced a final rule authorizing a new Oregon recreational fishery for groundfish, such as yellowtail and widow rockfish, at midwater depths greater than 40 fathoms. Recreational fishing for rockfish off Oregon generates more than $14 (continued)


The cost of closing commercial fisheries

Fishermen lost jobs and as much as $9 million

Closure of the commercial ocean salmon troll fishery last year is estimated to have cost $5.8 million to $8.9 million in lost income for fishermen, with the loss of 200 to 330 jobs. This is according to a new model that determines the cost of fisheries closures based on the choices fishermen make. Scientists hope the model, described for the first time this week in the scientific journal Marine Policy, will help policy makers anticipate the economic toll of fisheries closures. Such foresight (continued)


Auto dealer donates van to mission

Warrenton KIA donated a van to Astoria Rescue Mission last week after learning it was having trouble serving the homeless with just one vehicle. “God hasn't given up on these people, and it’s nice to know that neither has Warrenton KIA,” said David Newman, the mission’s executive director. “Many who come to us are struggling with overwhelming problems. The Astoria Rescue Mission helps provide for their physical, emotional and spiritual needs. To know that someone cares, means a great (continued)


Deadline approaches for May 15 primary election

Those who want to vote in the May 15 primary election and those who want to change their party affiliations have until April 24. All forms must be hand-delivered by 5 p.m. or postmarked on or before April 24. To be eligible to vote, you must be an Oregon resident, a U.S. citizen, and be at least 18 years old by Election Day.  For voters not registered with a political party, the Independent Party of Oregon has chosen to open its primary election to voters who are not members of any party for (continued)


Officers complete standards training

Several local law enforcement professionals graduate next week from the basic police class at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training. The 16-week course covers survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition and dozens of other subjects. Astoria Police Chief Geoff Spalding will speak at graduation ceremonies at 11 a.m. April 13 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 (continued)

Columnists & Other Opinions

This Week in Aboriginal History: Sen. Ben Nighthorse, a Northern Cheyenne, is born

April 13, 1933: Ben Nighthorse Campbell, a Northern Cheyenne, is born in Auburn, Calif. He will become a judo champion, a jeweler and a U.S. senator from Colorado (1993-2005). For a time, he is the only American Indian in Congress. April 14, 2007: The Morongo Indian reservation in Southern California and its 775 adult members reportedly received roughly $15,000 to $20,000 per person, per month in casino profits. Twenty years earlier, the tribe’s average annual household income was $13,000. (continued)


Senior Moments: When in doubt, eat pie first

My iPhone is truly an amazing tool that can evoke all kinds of emotions into my day, especially when I zero in on the weather. I’m following weather in 19 locations and, would you believe, Tuesday of this week there was rain for only our area and Auburn, Wash.? As children we used to say, “No fair.” My husband always encouraged our six kids and me to focus on the good of a situation, especially if it were something we had no control over. So why am I complaining about everyone except tw (continued)


This Week in Aboriginal History: Creek Indian Ernest Childers receives Medal of Honor

April 6, 1875: Black Horse is one of several Southern Cheyenne sent to prison in St. Augustine, Fla., (from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency - later called Fort Reno), for their part in the uprisings in Indian Territory, and Texas. While handcuffed, he attempts to escape by hiding among the rest of his tribe. He is pursued and mortally wounded by Army guards under the command of Capt. Andrew Bennett, 5th Infantry.  Several shots miss Black Horse and hit other Cheyenne. The Cheyenne retaliate (continued)


Senior Moments: The importance of water

Many of my senior friends and acquaintances have begun groaning about fixing meals. Especially if it’s only themselves who need to eat. As seniors, does it even matter what, when or if we eat regular meals? Many of us have taken that bumpy, painful ambulance ride to the hospital. I know I’ve had my turn and, sad to tell you, but it seems there are no shock absorbers on that vehicle. Maybe it depends on who is driving. Anyway, so many times what do we hear when the doctor looks us over? (continued)


A Messages from the Mayor: Growth is great, but prompts city to set goals

Warrenton is a very exciting place to be. We’ve seen unprecedented growth in the past 10 years. This has translated into a cornucopia of shopping and dining choices, and we’re building more housing than any other city in the county. There’s something for just about everybody. There’s no denying — these changes have come with growing pains, but we are poised to meet those challenges. The primary question we’re asking is “What decisions can we make now to ensure Warrenton is a great (continued)

Events

Event celebrates transit district's 25 years

A ribbon-cutting and open house for Sunset Empire Transportation District’s Transit Center is set for 11:45 a.m. Thursday, April 26, at the transit center on Marine Drive. The transit center is celebrating its 25th anniversary. On Jan. 27, 1993, the Clatsop County Board of Commissioners held a hearing to consider formation of the proposed transportation district to encompass all of Clatsop County (excluding the city limits of Gearhart at that time). The final public hearing was March 10, (continued)


Cancer support, chronic conditions classes begin

Two new health classes start up next week and are free to attendees. “Cancer: Thriving and Surviving” is 9:30 a.m. to noon on Mondays, April 16 through May 21. The class is open to anyone living with cancer and their caregiver/support person. The workshop is designed to enhance regular treatment and covers frustration fatigue, pain, isolation and making decisions about treatment and complementary therapies. “Living Well with Chronic Conditions” is 9:30 a.m. to noon on Thursdays, April (continued)


Youth can win by opening a Wauna savings account

Wauna Credit Union will hold a youth savings challenge the entire month of April at all its branches. Any child or teenager making a savings deposit will receive fun gifts and is eligible to win prizes. Financial education opportunities for kids will be available as well. A 2017 national survey found that about 60 percent of Americans have less than $1,000 in savings and nearly 40 percent had none. (continued)


Opry's 'See How They Run' farce kicks off today

“See How They Run,” a play presented by Astor Street Opry Company, begins its monthlong run today, March 30, at the playhouse, 129 W. Bond St., Astoria. The fast-paced farce is set in post-World War II Europe in an English vicarage. Characters include an American actor and actress, a cockney maid, a drunken spinster, four clergymen and a bishop. The play is at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights through April 28 with two Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. The box office window opens an hour befo (continued)


Oregon artists featured at Clatsop College exhibit

“Empathies and Energies,” an exhibit of ceramics, prints and photographs by three Oregon artists, will be shown April 2 to May 10 at the Royal Nebecker Gallery on the campus of Clatsop Community College. The exhibit features ceramics and prints by internationally acclaimed artist Frank Boyden of Otis, infrared photographs by Rich Bergeman of Corvallis and ceramics and sculpture by Renee McKitterick, chairwoman of the art department at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany. A publ (continued)

Police and Public Safety

Highway 26 crash kills two

Two Portland-area drivers were killed on Highway 26 Sunday morning when one of them lost control and struck the other head-on, the Oregon State Police reported. The crash occurred 13 miles east of the Highway 101 junction, an area with two lanes in each direction, about 9 a.m. Jesus M. Ramirez-Cortes, 19, of Milwaukie was headed west in a 2006 Audi when it crossed into the eastbound lanes and struck an oncoming 2009 Jeep Cherokee driven by Sylvia L. Kearns, 63, of Vancouver, Wash. Both drivers (continued)


Bicyclist struck by truck, injured

A Warrenton woman was injured Monday when she was struck by a truck while riding her bicycle on Highway 101 south of Costco. Marvel L. Williams, 33, was riding south on the northbound highway shoulder when a 2014 Toyota Tacoma struck her about 5:38 p.m. She was taken by ambulance to Columbia Memorial Hospital with a broken shoulder and broken ankle. The vehicle that struck her was driven by Curtis R. Schluter, 22, of Warrenton, who told officers he didn’t see the bicyclist until after he’d (continued)


Fight between brothers leads to arrest for assault

A Hammond man was arrested on suspicion of assault after a sheriff’s deputy spotted him in an altercation with his brother. A sheriff’s sergeant who was serving some civil paperwork pulled into the family’s driveway in the 200 block of Tyee Street about 8:45 p.m. April 3 and saw one of the brothers bent over, holding his chest and having some difficulty breathing, according to a probable cause declaration filed by Warrenton Police Department. The man told the deputy his brother accused (continued)


Citizen Police Academy begins April 17

Six local law enforcement agencies have joined together to develop a citizen patrol, sometimes referred to as the “eyes and ears of law enforcement.” The 2018 Citizen Police Academy begins Tuesday, April 17, and runs through mid-June. Attendees will learn about the different aspects of law enforcement including crime scenes, investigations, use of Tasers and firearms and they’ll get to tour various facilities including the Clatsop County Jail. Classes are 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays through (continued)


Public Safety Calls for week of April 13

Warrants Arrest, 10 p.m. April 4, 400 block Northwest Ridge Road. Caleb Daniel Connell, 30, of Warrenton was pick up on an outstanding probation violation warrant and released pending a court hearing. Thefts Items stolen from campsite, 7:40 p.m. March 29, transient camp behind Goodwill. A 56-year-old man reported someone took his clothes, cell phone and bicycle tire. Purse stolen, 9:13 p.m. April 7, Walgreens. Wallet stolen from purse, 12:38 p.m. April 8, Costco. Four stolen trailers, 12:36 (continued)


Public Safety Calls for week of April 6

Thefts/burglaries Employee theft, 12:22 a.m. March 23, Fred Meyer. Jeremy Robert Hahn, 39, of Warrenton was arrested on suspicion of theft II and released pending a court hearing. Suspicious circumstances/disturbances Malicious mischief, 2:56 p.m. March 27, Warrenton Community Library. An outside electrical box was tampered with and a padlock opened. Disorderly conduct, 10:15 p.m. March 27, Warrenton Mini Mart parking lot. Joe W. Blackler, 36, of Warrenton was arrested on suspicion of (continued)